Pam DeGemmis - Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage


If you’re in a space with a small kitchen, you know that you face a lot of problems including not enough storage, minuscule amounts of prep space, and barely enough room for more than one person in the kitchen at a time. The layout of the room along with the design is what you must work with when you have a small kitchen. There are a few storage solutions that you can use to make your kitchen into a workable space.



Clear The Clutter


Do you have a lot of gadgets hanging around your kitchen that you aren’t using on a regular basis? If there’s no space to store them, perhaps you should consider getting rid of them. That ice cream maker that you may have thought was a good idea to purchase may sit unused, taking up space. You should store only the things you need, and get rid of any items that are just collecting dust. 


Use An Armoire Or Other Shelving Unit


Small kitchens often lack cabinet space. You can use items like armories and bookshelves to give yourself more storage space. Whether you need to store dishes, food items, or pots and pans, these unusual items can help to provide you big amounts of storage. You can even add your own shelves to kitchen walls. All of these ideas provide inexpensive, yet practical solutions to your kitchen storage woes. 


Find An Island


There are carts and other portable kitchen island units that exist to provide additional storage and prep space fro you. Many of these have fold-out counter space and drawers and cabinets. If you have some floor space in your small kitchen, this could be a great use of that space. 


Hang Your Things


No matter how small your kitchen is, you have some room to hang things. You can use hooks in various places in the kitchen whether it’s on a wall or under a shelf. All of your utensils and pots and pans have the ability to hang up somewhere. Give yourself some more storage room and maximize the space that you do have in the kitchen. There are various designs that you can make use of to hang pots and pans using hooks, racks, or even a hanging shelf. Hang your utensils strategically so they are within reach of your cooking area.


Work Upwards


Remember that you have a lot of space available over your head in most cases in a small kitchen. The more you can maximize vertical space, the better off you’ll be. You can place your least used items the highest up and work your way down. 


With the right techniques, storage space doesn’t have to be a huge issue in a small kitchen.


Photo by NeONBRAND on Unsplash

The headboard has become an integral part of bedroom furniture in the contemporary bedroom. Often the centerpiece of a bedroom, there are many design options available to you. Some are simple and understated. Others may feature cushioned back support, storage functions or built-in reading lights.

Wooden

Wooden headboards are a classic and timeless choice. Traditional wooden styles can take center stage or be beautifully understated, letting your bedding or other design features take the spotlight. You’ll find paneled options, mission, spindle or sleigh styles and even variations that incorporate shelving or drawers for storage. Modern options could use simple shapes that highlight rustic or distressed finishes.

A wooden headboard doesn’t have to be traditional. For a more unusual wooden option, consider repurposing an intricate antique door or a hand-carved medallion. 

Upholstered

Upholstered headboards are often finished with fine textiles like velvet and satin but they can also be found in leather or leather-like materials. There are plenty of understated styles that come in standard sizes but many upholstered headboards are quite large and can become a natural focal point for the room. Sophisticated details like brass nailheads or thick piping are often used in these designs.

There are DIY options available that can show you how to add upholstery to an existing headboard. Consider this option if you already have a headboard that is a size that fits your space well.

Paint or Textiles

If your room is on the smaller side and you want to conserve space, incorporate a headboard that is either painted on the wall or created with hanging textiles.

If you opt to paint, carefully measure and draw your design on the wall where the head of your bed will be. Use painters tape to achieve a crisp line. It’s easy to repaint if you change your color scheme or bedroom style so this is a good option if you often like to refresh your space.

If textiles are a better fit for you, consider installing a decorative curtain rod near the ceiling line above your bed. You can use the curtain rod to hang curtains, tapestries or even macrame or woven pieces. If you have a few bedding sets that you cycle through, this gives you the flexibility to easily update the hanging textile to match.


Getting your home ready to sell entails quite a lot. Staging, taking photos, stocking the toiletries, and--in the case of an open house--entertaining guests. You want the visitors to your home to feel welcome and like they could live there someday.

To achieve this it takes planning and an eye for what really “works” in your home. To do this you’ll have to let go of everything you’ve made your home into and turn it into a blank slate where others can imagine it fitting their personal taste.

In this article, we’re going to give you some tips on preparing your home for an open house or showing to leave the best possible impression on your visitors.

Remove yourself from the picture

It might be sad to take down your family photos and personal effects, but imagine yourself in a visitor’s shoes. When you enter a home you’re thinking of buying, you don’t want to be distracted by what the previous family did with the home. Rather, you want to look forward and imagine your own family making a life there.

Declutter

Even the most minimalistic of homeowners tend to accumulate a lot of stuff over the years. However, walking into a home filled with items is distracting from the features of the home. You want to draw people’s eyes toward the best characteristics of your home--whether that’s spaciousness or architectural features.

We suggest packing your belongings by room and renting out a storage facility while you wait to move into your new place.

Stage appropriately

Working with someone to stage your home is a guaranteed way to make sure your house looks welcoming for your guests and photos. However, if you plan on doing the staging yourself take a look at some similarly styled homes online to find out what looks good in their photos. When we furnish our homes, we do it based on our personal taste, comfort, and utility. Staged homes are about aesthetics and atmosphere.

Once you’ve finished staging, it’s time to clean up after yourself. Wipe down surfaces, polish wood, and clean the windows.

Don’t neglect the exterior

The outside of your home is as important as the inside. It will be visitor’s first impression when they arrive at your driveway. To prepare, make sure your siding and windows are clear of dirt, the lawn mowed, the gutters cleaned, and the doors freshly painted, if necessary. Sweep the driveway and remove any yard tools from sight.

Welcoming guests

Your real estate agent knows how to run an effective open house. However, here are a few key things to remember on the day your guests will arrive.

First, light a candle and use air fresheners where necessary. A neutral smell is the best option, but an air freshener is better than a bad one if there are parts of your home that are prone to bad smells.

Next, make sure the bathrooms are stocked with toilet paper, tissues, and clean towels. If yours are getting old, it could be a good time to replace hand towels altogether.

Finally, welcome your guests with a new welcome mat at the front door to make a great first impression.


After you accept a homebuyer's offer on your residence, he or she likely will complete a home inspection. Then, the homebuyer may choose to move forward with the home purchase, rescind or modify his or her offer or ask the home seller to complete home improvements.

Ultimately, a home seller is likely to have many questions following a home inspection, including:

1. What did the homebuyer discover during the home inspection?

As a home seller, it is important to do everything possible to enhance your residence before you add it to the real estate market. By doing so, you can boost your chances of generating substantial interest in your house. Plus, when a homebuyer performs a home inspection, he or she is unlikely to find any problems that may slow down the home selling process.

An informed home seller may conduct a home appraisal prior to listing his or her house on the real estate market. This appraisal enables a home seller to identify potential trouble areas within a residence and explore ways to address such problems.

If you failed to perform a home appraisal, there is no need to worry. For home sellers, it is important to see a home inspection as a learning opportunity. And if a homebuyer identifies problems with your residence during a home inspection, you should try to work with him or her to resolve these issues.

2. Should I stand my ground after a home inspection?

Be realistic after a home inspection, and you'll be able to make the best decision about how to proceed.

For example, a home seller who goes above and beyond the call of duty may address major home problems prior to listing his or her house on the real estate market. This home seller will dedicate the necessary time and resources to correct home problems and ensure a homebuyer is able to purchase a top-notch residence.

But what happens if a homebuyer identifies problems during a home inspection, despite the fact that a home seller already tried to correct various home issues?

A home seller should consider the homebuyer's inspection report findings closely. If minor home repairs are needed, he or she may be able to fix these problems to move forward with a home sale. Or, if a homebuyer is making exorbitant demands, a home seller may feel comfortable allowing the homebuyer to walk away from a home sale.

3. How should I proceed after a home inspection?

A home inspection can be stressful for both a home seller and a homebuyer. After the home inspection is completed, both parties will be better equipped than ever before to make informed decisions.

If a homebuyer encounters many problems with a residence, he or she will let the home seller know about these issues. Then, a home seller can complete assorted home repairs, offer a discounted price on a home or refuse to perform the requested home maintenance.

Working with a real estate agent is ideal for a home seller, particularly when it comes to home inspections. A real estate agent will negotiate with a homebuyer on your behalf and ensure you streamline the home selling process.


Photo by Free-Photos via Pixabay

Making your home a little more green won’t take much time or effort, but the results will pay off for years to come. You’ll consume fewer products, be exposed to fewer chemicals and even spend less money every month. Incorporate one or more of these easy green ideas into your home routine to see just how easy it is to live in an eco-friendly way.

  • Buy local: When it comes to food, items that are in season or produced near your home not only cost less, they don’t have to be trucked a long way to get to you. Less gasoline is consumed and your food is fresher, too, when you buy local produce, eggs and meat.
  • Swap out light bulbs: Swapping your conventional light bulbs for LED or smart bulbs can cut your energy consumption and the amount of bulbs you use. You don’t have to do this all at once, simply replace bulbs with more energy efficient models as they burn out.
  • Check for leaks: Faucets, outdoor hoses and toilets that run or leak are wasting water, and probably generating higher bills each month. Track down and repair leaks to conserve water and save.
  • Lower your water temperature: Lower the temperature on your water heater and you’ll save money. You’ll also make your home safer for kids or elderly family members, since overly hot water can lead to burns.
  • Green Clean: You can buy home cleaners that are made with fewer chemicals – or even make your own. Switch out over time, as you run out of conventional cleaners, and you’ll end up with a greener, healthier home.
  • Choose cloth over paper: It’s not always feasible, but using cloth napkins and towels in place of paper ones will cut your consumption. Save the disposable ones for bad spills and messes, and use cloth for everything else. You’ll use much less paper and see a dip in your spending, too.

Any of these ideas can help you go green at home, without much effort or expense. Choose one to start with and incorporate it into your routine – even small steps make a difference when you are opting for a greener lifestyle and home.